Sunday, March 3, 2013

The other day I was asked how to say STRAPIONY

It's an interesting word. When I heard this question I was a bit perplexed because I couldn't find a direct translation of the word. I replied that I would rather try to use a word that would mean 'strapiony' but wouldn't mean this directly...
Foto: Flickr.

My first thought was 'worried', which seems to be the most adequate translation for me. Anyhow, Słownik języka polskiego (the Polish Language Dictionary) tells us that 'strapiony' means «zmartwiony, przygnębiony; też: świadczący o takim stanie»

Now, in English there are many words which refer to the above mentioned state:

  • WORRIED
  • DISTRESSED
  • DEJECTED
  • CRESTFALLEN
  • DESOLATE
  • DISCONSOLATE
  • HAGGARD
The thing, however, is that each of these words has its own translation...

  • WORRIED: zmartwiony
  • DISTRESSED: udręczony, zmartwiony
  • DEJECTED: przygnębiony
  • CRESTFALLEN: zbity z tropu, osępiały
  • DESOLATE: samotny, niepocieszony, stroskany
  • DISCONSOLATE: niepocieszony, posępny
  • HAGGARD: wymęczony, wynędzniały, patrzący błędnym wzrokiem
The thing is that we can use any of the words above to describe the condition of a 'strapiony' person :) But there is also one other word we can use to refer to 'strapiony', and this is


  • HEARTSORE
...which is the word which means 'deeply grieved, sorrowing' so... we might risk saying 'strapiony'... This word, though, is old-fashioned today and not that frequently used. Either way that was a great question to investigate.

When was the last time you felt 'strapiony'?

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