Tuesday, June 5, 2012

words that begin with ex- expire

A warm (as it's rather chilly outside) hello to you on Tuesday! Today I wanted to talk about another 'ex-' word:

EXPIRE  

This is a very common word in English as people often talk about a whole range of things that expire... The maning of the word in English is to come to an end or to die...Yeah... But what does the word mean in Polish? The meaning is tracić ważność, wygasać, upływać (o terminie). In literary texts the word 'expire' may also mean wyzionąć ducha, umrzeć...So as you see there are potentially lots of situations in which we may use the word 'expire'...

Let's take a look at a few examples form the Net:
  • Our television license expires next week.
  • The contract between the two companies will expire soon.
  • “I wrestle bulls”, he said, then he expired where he stood. 
  • The poor man expired at about six o'clock in the morning, having lingered three or four hours in great agony.
  • Unfortunately, she expired when I was 13. 
  • It sounds like your fixed-term contract expired when you started maternity leave, but they wanted to keep you on and so...
  • He is currently with Virgin but only till his contract expires when he will be transferring to BT.   
My question to you:
Are you a perfectionist? How much time in advance are you stressed because your document is to expire? Has any document of yours expired recently?


10 comments:

  1. I never knew "to expire" had an alternative meaning i.e. to pass away. Thanks a lot!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks a lot. Why don't you join me on this blog? It would be lovely to hear more often from you. Anyhow, thanks for your post :) Have a good day!

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  2. Hi! I've already pursued my own blogging career (as you can see in my profile) ;) But nothing speaks against me adding something every now and then. What do you expect from your contributor?

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    Replies
    1. I see... I have already visited your blog. It looks very promising :) As for my expectations... well... I cannot impose too much, can I? I would just like you to leave your responses to my posts, most of which, end with a question or a thought-provoking message :) What would you like me to do in return?

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  3. Fine. Deal. In return you could actually do the very same thing. Anyhow, are you a teacher or any of the sort? Or an enthusiast?

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  4. Great. I'll do my best then :) I have been both... a teacher and an enthusiast. Just between you and me... I have been IN LOVE with English since time immemorial :)

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    1. I was a 9 yr. old kid when I fell in love with English head over heels. When I was 11 I wrote my own stories based on American TV series and a diary. Later on, having acquired habits I was tought at school, my natural spontaneity was killed. But my love has never burned out. I love all languages.

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    2. Great. After all it is love that matters...

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  5. It's funny how we use body idioms to describe things of reality.

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    Replies
    1. I wouldn't say it's funny. I'd rather say those nice English idioms are just a fantastic means of expressing things in a more poetic and at the same time more precise manner... Don't you agree?

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